Meg and Pottsy go camping. A story from Meg.

Was it to celebrate Pottsy’s birthday last Monday? Let’s see what Meg has to say…

The GPS and Pottsy disagree about the road we are on.

The GPS and Pottsy disagree about the road we are on.

Pottsy and I trailered the bikes down to Port on Sunday, dropped them at his mate’s place and took off for Gloucester via Comboyne and Nodingbul Road. The 42-degree heat was knocking me around a bit. It had us stopping and sitting in any creek that had the slightest trickle. A couple of slight detours and we reached Gloucester in time to catch up with some of his mates, have a  couple of drinks at the pub and set up the tents on his friend’s dairy farm just as the sun was setting.

Waking up to this.

Waking up to this.

The next morning we had a quick look around the farming area where Pottsy grew up before a hardcore adventure rider brekkie (or so I’ve been told) of strawberry milkshakes and cappuccinos.

Morning coffee while camped at the dairy.

Morning coffee while camped at the dairy.

The plan was to ride over Barrington Tops and to Walcha for the night, but an overly helpful man had me on edge when he talked up how rough the roads were and how he got three busted tyres on the 4WD while I was refueling. I sooked out and Pottsy took me on a nice little detour around the base instead.

It was only a quick blat up Thunderbolts Way before the heat took its toll on me again.

As I pulled into the lookout, a bloke in a 4WD pulled up close, opened his fridge and handed us some cold cans of softdrink. I’m still amazed at how responsive people are to bikes. We must’ve sat there for half an hour chatting and cooling down. People would wave, and kids stop and look. What a great community of strangers all drawn to the one thing.

Riding down into Gloucester

Riding down into Gloucester

Tiri Crossing, where we spent a very pleasant 10 mins chowing down on snakes, wetting ourselves down and watching a 2wd car with 4 blokes and a kayak tied to the roof get thoroughly bogged in the gravel.

Tiri Crossing, where we spent a very pleasant 10 minutes chowing down on snakes, wetting ourselves down and watching a 2wd car with 4 blokes and a kayak tied to the roof get thoroughly bogged in the gravel.

Walcha via Nowendoc was another awesome gravel road through spectacular farming country. The smell of the pine forest, paddocks and of everlasting daisies and the storm clouds chased us onto Walcha. With neither of our super expensive Big W tents bring particularly waterproof, we made a decision to head home and hightailed it down the Oxley and back to Port.

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Mud Hut Road, detour around Barrington Tops.

Mud Hut Road, detour around Barrington Tops.

Well, hightailed may not be the right word. I was wrecked. It was the longest I’ve spent on the bike and my knees were in agony. I would have just about set the record for the slowest ever trip down the hill from Gingers Creek.

It was my first proper camp on the bike, where I’ve carried everything I needed to cook and sleep, and although it ended a day early I still got enough of a fix to want to do it again.

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3 comments

  • Pottsy on November 27, 2014 at 7:12 pm said:

    Well it wad a great ride, about 720kms in 2 days, and 450 of those On the last day! And meg is playing down how hot it was, especially on the first day, about 43 degrees and very humid, when she turned red and was nearly fainting while still riding, but she still wanted to keep on riding. She showed she is one tough little adventure rider!
    And it is all lies about and strawberry milkshakes for breakfast – there is no photographic proof so it never happened!
    At the servo, when the old mate in the 4×4 said he tore up 3 Tyres going over Barrington tops, Meg wasn’t the only one keen to take the easier option around to thunderbolt’s way, I was just glad she mentioned it first !
    There wasn’t any option but to go slow down the Oxley to port – what she failed to mention was the storm that had just gone through before us, leaving water soaked leaves, branches and debris all over the road, it left the a mess to weave through there wad no other safe option.
    Meg now has a great set up drz250, and a real zest for adventure, I know she was very nervous at the start, but she dug deep, soldiered on, and was never without a smile on her face through a few tough moments, it was a great rode that I am keen to do again. Will give a bit of notice next time and get a few more along for the trip!

  • Meg on December 1, 2014 at 12:49 pm said:

    Hey thanks, I’m growing pretty fond of that little DR.

    Every now and then I think it’s time to go up to a 650 but I can pick the 250 by myself, its nice and low, and I don’t have the need to do 100km/hr that often so it’ll do me for a while I think.

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